Reading Strategies
(for Students)

 

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What are Reading Strategies?  

Reading strategies are those things students do to help them understand what they are reading.  Reading strategies are often categorized as those behaviors designed to help students before, during, and after they read.  As a reader, it is important to learn and use multiple strategies for different texts, different reading purposes, and for different subject areas.

 

 

Reading Strategy Tips:

Click here for reading strategies PowerPoint.Rounded Rectangular Callout: Check this out!

 

Web Resources on Reading Strategies: 

  1. Pre-reading strategies: http://www.studygs.net/preread.htm
  2. Strategies to use during and after reading: http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/teaching-strategies

 

Common Q/A on Reading Strategies:

 

1. What reading strategies do I need to learn?

 

 

 

There are many strategies that may help you with your reading.  It is helpful to learn strategies that will help you before, during, and after you read as well as those strategies that will help you recognize new words, understand vocabulary, and gain meaning from the text.  According to reading experts, “good readers” do the

following to improve their comprehension:

·         Establish a purpose

·         Preview the text

·         Activate/use prior knowledge

·         Make predictions

·         Confirm, revise, or reject predictions

·         Create mental images

·         Identify organizational patterns

·         Determine the most important ideas and themes

·         Ask questions

·         Clarify understanding

·         Connect text to self, world, and other texts

·         Draw inferences

·         Summarize and synthesize

·         Monitor comprehension

·         Use fix-up strategies for difficult words/phrases

·         Share responses

 
   

2. What should I do if I don’t like to read?

Unfortunately, not every student enjoys reading.  This may be for a variety of reasons:  the reading is difficult, the material isn’t interesting, it takes too much time or other more specific reasons unique to each student.  However, since reading is used widely, both in school and outside of school, it is important to learn to read as well as possible.  This occurs with practice.  Look for reading topics that interest you.  Choose reading materials that interest you:  magazines, Internet sites, comic books, newspapers, etc. and use those materials to spark your enjoyment.  Bottom line:  even if you don’t like to read, practice the skills that will help you to become the best reader possible.

   
3. What do you mean by before, during and after strategies?

 

Reading teachers and experts have helped us to think about reading as those things we do to help us before we read a text, while we are reading the text, and after we have finished reading the text.  Some examples include:

   

Before Reading the Text (Pre-reading)

·         Establish a purpose

·         Preview or survey the text

·         Use prior knowledge

·         Make predictions

·         Identify new vocabulary

   

During Reading

·         Confirm revise or reject predictions

·         Create mental images

·         Ask questions

·         Clarify understanding

·         Connect text to self, world and other texts

·         Draw inferences

   

After Reading

·         Summarize and synthesize

·         Respond to text

·         Answer questions

·         Connect text to self, world and other texts

   
4.  What is SQ3R?

SQ3R is a commonly known and used strategy for teaching comprehension of reading material.  The acronym stands for Survey, Question, Read, Recite and Review.  Students are encouraged to begin reading by surveying the contents (looking over the material), questioning to enhance understanding, reading with purpose, reciting in search of answers, and reviewing with the intent to remember.  This is an effective strategy to learn and apply as text becomes more difficult, particularly for textbooks at the secondary level.

   
5. What is meant by skimming, scanning and speed reading?

 

All three are techniques for reading information and depend upon the purpose of the reading assignment and the type of text involved.  The skill of skimming implies looking over a chapter or unit quickly in order to have a general idea of its contents.  Scanning suggests the review of a particular text to find a specific piece of information. 

 

For example, we skim through a report to have a rough idea of what it says but we scan a page of the telephone directory to find a particular name or number. Skimming requires a greater degree of reading and word recognition skills as it involves a more thorough understanding of the text. Scanning to find a particular piece of information can be achieved successfully by readers who have less developed skills.  

 

Speed reading uses very specific techniques for helping students read large quantities of print very quickly.  Speed reading techniques help students gain the “big ideas”, but may sacrifice some of the details in the process.  It is not necessary for all students to learn speed reading techniques but may be very beneficial for certain content areas or career choices.

 

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